© Egbert Hertsen
EgbertHertsen

Awards

Chasing galore

Award and certificate chasing is a major motivating force that occur on the bands day after day. I find the reward of having a beautiful certificate or even plaque very gratifying. It takes skillful operating to qualify and aside from expanding one's general amateur radio related knowledge, it's also a fascinating way to learn about geography, history or political structure of the world. Most active HAMs try to achieve DXCC, WAZ and perhaps a few other. However, there's a world beyond these classics. Over 3,000 awards worldwide are available. Most national radio clubs offer at least one award for confirmed contacts with the states, provinces, districts, ... that form their territory. I'm after these and many other awards... they form the motive for nearly all the QSOs I make day after day and year after year. I've been hooked on award chasing ever since I started as a SWL. Nowadays, my collection consists of well over 2,500 awards. If making QSOs and exchanging QSL cards are as much fun to you as they are to me chances are you're just one step away from becoming an amateur radio award chaser. One of the best features of Amateur Radio is the number of ways there are to enjoy this hobby. Ragchewing, experimentation, VHF/UHF, satellites, ARDF; it just goes on and on. Even at times when I used to be a SWL I have always been interested in DX, contests and award hunting. Most HAMs have at least heard about award classics such as DXCC for 100 confirmed countries. These classics are only a small part of the certificates available to the amateur radio community. To me, all these awards form a major motivation force my my daily on the air activity. Receiving a beautiful certificate to commemorate a specific achievement is one of amateurs radio's biggest thrills for ON4CAS.

Where to start?

It may sound obvious... if you'd like to get some awards you'll need to get on the air as much as you can. Exchanging QSL cards is part of the game as most certificates require proof of contacts. Getting your QSL cards organized is the first step. Sort all incoming cards by country, prefix or whatever suits you... Getting a small cupboard where you can easily classify your cards is probably more useful than old shoeboxes. I purchased some index cards to keep the cards properly sorted. With over 65,000 cards on hand it simply isn't sufficient to sort them by country; to keep it well-organized, I keep the cards by call areas.

Storage

Awards are a great decoration for your shack walls, but if your XYL thinks that kind of wallpaper isn't a good idea or if your award collection gets a bit larger putting them into large photoalbums might be a good idea. Below is a photograph of a part my own award collection. Trophies, pennants and other presentations get a deserved place in the shack

What awards are

available?

Although rather arbitrary, most awards fall into one of the following classes: certificates for working countries and continents; awards for working zones and locators; diploma’s available for working provinces, states, districts, counties, call areas etc of specific countries; awards available for working stations in a specific region of a country or city are also available; certificates available for working prefixes; awards available for working clubs and their members; diploma’s available for working mountains. certificates available for working historical and special event stations You'll soon find out that some awards do not fit in any of the above listed categories. However, the above classification should give newcomers and others a good idea about the award scope.
Aside from chasing various award and certificates, there are some award programmes I actively get involved in.
some programs in which i actively participate
examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples examples
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© Egbert hertsen
EgbertHertsen

Awards

Chasing galore

Award and certificate chasing is a major motivating force that occur on the bands day after day. I find the reward of having a beautiful certificate or even plaque very gratifying. It takes skillful operating to qualify and aside from expanding one's general amateur radio related knowledge, it's also a fascinating way to learn about geography, history or political structure of the world. Most active HAMs try to achieve DXCC, WAZ and perhaps a few other. However, there's a world beyond these classics. Over 3,000 awards worldwide are available. Most national radio clubs offer at least one award for confirmed contacts with the states, provinces, districts, ... that form their territory. I'm after these and many other awards... they form the motive for nearly all the QSOs I make day after day and year after year. I've been hooked on award chasing ever since I started as a SWL. Nowadays, my collection consists of well over 2,500 awards. If making QSOs and exchanging QSL cards are as much fun to you as they are to me chances are you're just one step away from becoming an amateur radio award chaser. One of the best features of Amateur Radio is the number of ways there are to enjoy this hobby. Ragchewing, experimentation, VHF/UHF, satellites, ARDF; it just goes on and on. Even at times when I used to be a SWL I have always been interested in DX, contests and award hunting. Most HAMs have at least heard about award classics such as DXCC for 100 confirmed countries. These classics are only a small part of the certificates available to the amateur radio community. To me, all these awards form a major motivation force my my daily on the air activity. Receiving a beautiful certificate to commemorate a specific achievement is one of amateurs radio's biggest thrills for ON4CAS.

Where to start?

It may sound obvious... if you'd like to get some awards you'll need to get on the air as much as you can. Exchanging QSL cards is part of the game as most certificates require proof of contacts. Getting your QSL cards organized is the first step. Sort all incoming cards by country, prefix or whatever suits you... Getting a small cupboard where you can easily classify your cards is probably more useful than old shoeboxes. I purchased some index cards to keep the cards properly sorted. With over 65,000 cards on hand it simply isn't sufficient to sort them by country; to keep it well-organized, I keep the cards by call areas.

Storage

Awards are a great decoration for your shack walls, but if your XYL thinks that kind of wallpaper isn't a good idea or if your award collection gets a bit larger putting them into large photoalbums might be a good idea. Below is a photograph of a part my own award collection. Trophies, pennants and other presentations get a deserved place in the shack

What awards are available?

Although rather arbitrary, most awards fall into one of the following classes: certificates for working countries and continents; awards for working zones and locators; diploma’s available for working provinces, states, districts, counties, call areas etc of specific countries; awards available for working stations in a specific region of a country or city are also available; certificates available for working prefixes; awards available for working clubs and their members; diploma’s available for working mountains. certificates available for working historical and special event stations You'll soon find out that some awards do not fit in any of the above listed categories. However, the above classification should give newcomers and others a good idea about the award scope.